The Great Flood

In 2012, Nigeria experienced unprecedented floods that affected more than 7.7 million people, 363 people were reported dead and more than 600,000 homes had been destroyed in over 32 states in Nigeria. 
Nigerian photographer August Udoh captures the disaster in this photo essay.
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Gotham City

Self taught, Brooklyn based photographer, Deshaun A. Craddock cruises New York City to capture the cold dark streets, giving us compelling images and the essence of the city. His city stills gives mystery yet familiarity and a sense of loneliness amongst congestion. He has succeeded in giving us amazing cityscapes. Continue reading

Caged Bird

“Find a way to make the work first and foremost. Do whatever you can to have that as a priority. Deal with the marketing and promoting of it after it has been made and you’re proud of it and you feel you couldn’t have worked harder. That way you can take it on the chin and still love it when it is not one critic’s cup of tea, you know?”
~ Cig Harvey, Photographer
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Portraits of Humans

“What appears in the pictures was the subject’s decision, not mine. I took what they presented—delicate moments—unadorned and unglamorous, yet tender and exquisite. —Ray Metzker
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Preserving Tradition

The pictures of Jan C Schlegel bear witness of the special encounters of the photographer with unique people on his trips through Africa and Asia. Since 1998, Jan C. Schlegel regularly travels to remote places, which are secluded from the tourism of the western world. On his tours the artist observed the rapid decline of traditions and increasing change of the way of life of the people within their tribes due to globalisation. The inexorable changes woke the urgent wish in the photographer to portrait people, to capture impressions and to preserve traditional life forms in his pictures. Thus Schlegel not only creates artistic photographs, but also documents and preserves unique pieces of art – the people themselves. None of people photographed wear special make-up or were specially dressed before the photographs were taken. Nothing was staged, nothing is fake. They were all captured in their own habitat – at the market, in the village square, or simply on the roadside. The only stylistic device Schlegel uses for each one of his photographs is a simple grey background. With it he concentrates the attention on the people, not on their living conditions. The basic message is the internal and external beauty of the pictured people. Schlegel emphasises their uniqueness, their value and their irreparableness. With his art he fights for the particularity and individuality of the cultures.
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