Black to Earth (NSFW)

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On the last day of Black History Month, The Human Gallery presents images from the collection of Gregory Prescott.  Here Prescott brings stunning artistic nude images of African American men and women connecting with the earth.  Not often do we see people of color in this light and this series is a great way to close out, artistically, Black History Month; showcasing diversity in the world of art photography.  Continue reading

Mambu

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Mambu Bayoh is a Sierra Leone/Liberian photographer who came to the United States at a young age, escaping the Liberian civil war. Drawn to the art of photography, Bayoh stopped his pursuit in Law and dedicated his time to his now current passion. His work not only crosses over into high fashion and street fashion, but into social documentation as well, capturing the vibrant softness and hidden strength of his subjects. Continue reading

Colorful World of Kehinde Wiley

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New York-based portraitist Kehinde Wiley will be awarded the U.S. Department of State Medal of Arts. Known for his flashy paintings that depict black men and women in the style of Old Master portraiture, Wiley is being honored for using his art to promote cultural diplomacy. He will receive his medal from Secretary of State John Kerry on January 21. Past medal honorees include Cai Guo-Qiang, Jeff Koons, Shahzia Sikander, Kiki Smith, and Carrie Mae Weems. First awarded in 2012, the U.S. Department of State Medal of Arts is given to artists for their commitment to Art in Embassies, a diplomatic program that encourages U.S. artists to go abroad and work with other artists. For AIE’s latest project, set to happen in 2017, Jenny Holzer will make a collaborative sculpture at the U.S. Embassy in London. The announcement precedes another landmark in the artist’s career—”Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic,” the painter’s first museum survey, which will open at the Brooklyn Museum in February. Roberts & Tilton, one of the galleries that represents Wiley, confirmed the news. Continue reading

Resistance

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Najee Dorsey’s mixed media series “Resistance,” is an artistic commentary on the various ways individuals have used their voice and bodies to “resist” and fight against the powers that be. Partially inspired by the Occupy Movement, Dorsey’s renditions include the Haitian Freedom Fighter Toussaint L’ouverture, A Native American man taking up modern arms, and an ode to unsung she-ro Claudette Colvin, amongst others. Dorsey also includes various protest signs and anecdotes that feature social commentary about the current economic and social condition in America. Utilizing the digital medium to create these works demonstrate Dorsey’s range as an artist. He is particularly adept at weaving in multiple colors and layers to tell a story both aesthetically and thematically. Continue reading

Family Portraits (NSFW)

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Although she is not related to them by blood—in fact, they are nearly all strangers—the pictures are remarkably intimate. Deana Lawson composes almost every element, often sketching scenes out on paper before working with the camera. Reflecting Western and African portraiture conventions, the works examine “the body’s ability to channel personal and social histories, drawing on the various formal and informal languages of the medium and its archival capabilities,” the artist says. The result is an alphabet of body compositions demonstrating humans’ seemingly limitless variety. The size of these photographs ensures that although they are intimate, they are also confrontational; viewers are invited into the world they depict, but strictly as spectators. Continue reading

Quazimotto

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The Human Gallery would like to spotlight Brooklyn photographer, J. Quazi King for his outstanding portraits and street photography, capturing the true essence of people of Brooklyn. His images are rich yet raw, stirred in with a lot of soul. Continue on as he introduce you to some of his friends…

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So you think you can dance?

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The Savoy Ballroom was located between 140th and 141st Streets on Lenox Avenue Harlem, New York City. The Savoy was a popular dance venue from the late 1920s to the 1950s and many dances such as Lindy Hop became famous here. It was one of the most famous dance halls of the swing era and home to legendary dancers like Frankie Manning, Norma Miller, Leon James and Al Minns. It was known downtown as the “Home of Happy Feet” but uptown, in Harlem, as “the Track”. Unlike the ‘whites only’ policy of the Cotton Club, the Savoy Ballroom was integrated where white and black Americans danced together.
Normally The Human Gallery look to showcase more contemporary work, but how could these images not make you smile?
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Water’s Edge (NSFW)

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Famed photographer, Fabrizio Ferri teamed with actor Djimon Hounsou to create these water ritual images, as part of his Acqua series.
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