Call of the wild

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It is rare that a photographer can excel at capturing the beauty of both a human and an animal in the same photograph. Katerina Plotnikova does just this. It is not either the person or the animal that is the focal point of the picture, but how they interact together. The results are simply stunning. Continue reading

Expressive Portraits of Africa

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This selection of portraits is made by Osborne Macharia, a Nairobi-based photographer. These vibrant portraits of men and women look expressive, very aesthetic thanks to the beautiful light effects. The artist proposes few kind of portraits, staging tribe men, women and children. Continue reading

The Great Flood

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In 2012, Nigeria experienced unprecedented floods that affected more than 7.7 million people, 363 people were reported dead and more than 600,000 homes had been destroyed in over 32 states in Nigeria. 
Nigerian photographer August Udoh captures the disaster in this photo essay.
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Weapons of Choice

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What if verbal abuse left the same scars as physical abuse? Would it be taken more seriously? That’s what photographer Richard Johnson hopes to accomplish with his new photo project, “Weapons of Choice.” Continue reading

Caged Bird

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“Find a way to make the work first and foremost. Do whatever you can to have that as a priority. Deal with the marketing and promoting of it after it has been made and you’re proud of it and you feel you couldn’t have worked harder. That way you can take it on the chin and still love it when it is not one critic’s cup of tea, you know?”
~ Cig Harvey, Photographer
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Portraits of Humans

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“What appears in the pictures was the subject’s decision, not mine. I took what they presented—delicate moments—unadorned and unglamorous, yet tender and exquisite. —Ray Metzker
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Fallen Angel

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Kamil Vojnar was born in the former Czechoslovakia in 1962. He studied at the School of Graphic Arts in Prague and began his career as a Graphic Designer. He left the country illegally (still Communist at the time) and moved to Vienna, and then eventually became a US citizen and finished his studies at the Art Institute of Philadelphia. He continued his career in Graphic Design which later led to illustration and imagery based on photography, working mostly for book and music publishing houses in New York City. At the same time, he continued to make his own imagery. After meeting his partner and having children, going back and forth between France and New York, they finally settled in St. Remy de Provence in South France where Vojnar has concentrated on his own work since 2005. He opened up an Atelier in St. Remy and then one in Paris in 2009, both of which carry his own work.
His work consists of images digitally layered from many different photographs and textures. They are mixed-media archival prints on fine art paper or mounted on canvas. Some of his images are layered pictures printed on semitransparent Thai paper. These unique photomontages are then varnished with oil and wax, and on occasion painted with oil paints. Kamil, as a painter, points out, “In a painting, you can paint anything you want. In the photographic , it must, on some level, exist first. That tension between what exists and what is made up is what interests me.” Thus, his images are often subject to very different interpretations
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Preserving Tradition

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The pictures of Jan C Schlegel bear witness of the special encounters of the photographer with unique people on his trips through Africa and Asia. Since 1998, Jan C. Schlegel regularly travels to remote places, which are secluded from the tourism of the western world. On his tours the artist observed the rapid decline of traditions and increasing change of the way of life of the people within their tribes due to globalisation. The inexorable changes woke the urgent wish in the photographer to portrait people, to capture impressions and to preserve traditional life forms in his pictures. Thus Schlegel not only creates artistic photographs, but also documents and preserves unique pieces of art – the people themselves. None of people photographed wear special make-up or were specially dressed before the photographs were taken. Nothing was staged, nothing is fake. They were all captured in their own habitat – at the market, in the village square, or simply on the roadside. The only stylistic device Schlegel uses for each one of his photographs is a simple grey background. With it he concentrates the attention on the people, not on their living conditions. The basic message is the internal and external beauty of the pictured people. Schlegel emphasises their uniqueness, their value and their irreparableness. With his art he fights for the particularity and individuality of the cultures.
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